Dissertation Copyright

Dissertation Copyright-24
You don’t need the copyright holder’s permission to include an excerpt / photo / diagram / whatever-you’re-using if any one of the following is true: Remember: Attribution is not the same as permission!Even if you cite your sources (which, of course, you will!

You don’t need the copyright holder’s permission to include an excerpt / photo / diagram / whatever-you’re-using if any one of the following is true: Remember: Attribution is not the same as permission!Even if you cite your sources (which, of course, you will!

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Step 3: What about other non-copyright legal or policy concerns?

Human subject research methodology, issues of indigenous knowledge, and other ethical concerns are best discussed with your dissertation advisors and institutional review boards.

At UC Berkeley, we’ve created a workflow and guide for you to tackle these kinds of important copyright and other legal questions.

Below, I’ve included highlights from the workflow, but there are plenty more best practices to draw upon in the guide.

If you are using materials from archives, museums, library special collections, you may need to consider website terms of use agreements or contracts you signed (or clicked through online) with the archival institution.

This is because, irrespective of whether the materials are protected by copyright, you may have entered into an agreement dictating whether or not you can include material from the works.But the workflow does address a few other legal questions that at first might seem like copyright questions, yet actually pertain to different legal doctrines.For instance, while copyright protects copyright holders’ property rights in their works, privacy law protects the interests of people who are the subjects of those works.Before using the workflow, it can be helpful first to understand what copyright is—and is not.In short, copyright means that authors get exclusive publishing, reproduction, and other rights over their original works of expression for limited periods of time.You’ve worked painstakingly for years (we won’t let on how many) on your magnum opus: your dissertation—the scholarly key to completing your graduate degree, securing a possible first book deal, and making inroads toward faculty status somewhere.Then, as you are about to submit your pièce de résistance through Pro Quest’s online administration system, you are confronted with the realization that—for students at many institutions—your dissertation is about to be made available open access online to readers all over the world (hurrah! Because your dissertation will be openly available online, there are many questions you need to address—both about what you put in your dissertation, and the choices you’ll need to make as you put it online.Another non-copyright legal issue that often comes up in the context of dissertations is contract law (see see p.185 of Peter Hirtle’s excellent book on digitization).Privacy rights in scholarship most often arise if you are seeking to use third party content like correspondence, diaries, and images that contain personal information about or pictures of particular people.But, they expire at death—meaning, you can’t be liable for disclosing private facts about a person no longer living.

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