Essay On Ode To A Nightingale By John Keats

Essay On Ode To A Nightingale By John Keats-38
Keats’ advises us not to think about suicide and take poisons such as wolf’s bane when melancholy is around.The first two lines of the third stanza in “Ode to a Nightingale”, “Fade far away, dissolve and quite forget what thou among the leaves hast never known” tells the readers that he wants to fade away and disappear with the birds which in this line, are expressed as “thou among the leaves”.

Keats’ advises us not to think about suicide and take poisons such as wolf’s bane when melancholy is around.The first two lines of the third stanza in “Ode to a Nightingale”, “Fade far away, dissolve and quite forget what thou among the leaves hast never known” tells the readers that he wants to fade away and disappear with the birds which in this line, are expressed as “thou among the leaves”.

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Another key idea that is reflected in the two poems “Ode on Melancholy” and “Ode to a Nightingale” is the beauty in nature.

This beauty in nature is shown in “Ode on Melancholy” in the second and third lines of stanza two from the simile and personification of “sudden from the heaven like a weeping cloud, That fosters the droop-headed flowers all”. The “droop-headed flowers” can both have a metaphorical or a literal meaning as the metaphorical meaning of “droop-headed” could be sadness whereas the literal meaning of “droop-headed” could just be because of the heavy rain.

“Fast-fading violets cover’d up in leaves” is a metaphor that implies that human lives are fleeting.

The sixth line or stanza two in “Ode on Melancholy” all refers to the beauty of nature.

The poems written by John Keats are primarily concerned with the conflicted nature of the human existence as they look at the human state often with sadness, beauty and the imagination of one’s mind.

The metaphysical world, beauty in nature and classical idealism are all pondered upon in Keats’ poems as these ideas are evidently indicated in the two poems “Ode on Melancholy” and “Ode To A Nightingale”.This is apparent in the first line of the first stanza when Keats’ tells his reader to “go not to Lethe, neither twist”.This suggests to not look for an easy way out by referring to ‘Lethe’ which in Greek mythology, was a river whose water caused those who drank it to forget the past.He is also aware of the lengthy process in having to endure suffering and pain sequentially to experience joy and content.Keats’ view on the metaphysical world is also explored in the third stanza of “Ode to a Nightingale”.In “Ode to a Nightingale”, Keats’ states “I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs”.This suggests that he is only imagining the scenery because it is too dark to see anything.The metaphysical world relating to immortality and mortality constantly appears in Keats’ two poems “Ode on Melancholy” and “Ode to a Nightingale”.In the second line of the first stanza Keats’ talks about “Wolf’s bane” which is a poisonous plant often used to commit suicide.The “morning rose” is the depiction of the beauty of nature, though a “morning” rose only lives for a short time and Keats’ is implying that the human experience of joy is fleeting.The beauty of nature in “Ode to a Nightingale” is represented by the nightingale and its everlasting song along with the joy it brings to the persona.

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