Kids Essay S 2010

Kids Essay S 2010-31
It makes intuitive sense that a child’s attachment style is largely a function of the caregiving the child receives in his or her early years.

It makes intuitive sense that a child’s attachment style is largely a function of the caregiving the child receives in his or her early years.

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Still, we can be sure that a child’s early experiences with his or her parents have a profound impact on his or her relationship skills as an adult.

Much of the knowledge we have on this subject today comes from a concept developed in the 1950s called The psychological theory of attachment was first described by John Bowlby, a psychoanalyst who researched the effects of separation between infants and their parents (Fraley, 2010).

These attachment behaviors are instinctive responses to the perceived threat of losing the survival advantages that accompany being cared for and attended to by the primary caregiver(s).

Since the infants who engaged in these behaviors were more likely to survive, the instincts were naturally selected and reinforced over generations.

Through several papers, numerous research studies, and theories that were discarded, altered, or combined, Bowlby and Ainsworth developed and provided evidence for attachment theory.

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Theirs was a more rigorous explanation and description of attachment behavior than any others on the topic at the time, including those that had grown out of Freud’s work and those that were developed in direct opposition to Freud’s ideas (Bretherton, 1992).

It’s clear now that not every issue can be traced back to one’s mother.

After all, there is another person involved in the raising (or at least the creation) of a child.

Bowlby hypothesized that the extreme behaviors infants engage in to avoid separation from a parent or when reconnecting with a physically separated parent—like crying, screaming, and clinging—were evolutionary mechanisms.

Bowlby thought these behaviors had possibly been reinforced through natural selection and enhanced the child’s chances of survival.

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