Northrop Frye Four Essays

Northrop Frye Four Essays-62
This is the groundbreaking book that officially introduced Jungian archetype theory into the realm of literary criticism. That should include the Golden Bough, Iliad, Odyssey, Faust, Bib This is the groundbreaking book that officially introduced Jungian archetype theory into the realm of literary criticism. That should include the Golden Bough, Iliad, Odyssey, Faust, Bible, Greek tragedy and Greek comedy, some other readings in mythology, the more the merrier.2) Milton, Dante, Spencer, some novels, the more the merrier.3) Shakespeare. The word 'inductive' suggests some sort of scientific procedure. Frye is of course much more humble about it than Milton (but who isn't?), and, in addressing his miltonic-kantian task, offers this volume as a mere attempt to annotate T. Eliot's ideas (18) (which ideas I regard as thoroughly reactionary and dullard).

This is the groundbreaking book that officially introduced Jungian archetype theory into the realm of literary criticism. That should include the Golden Bough, Iliad, Odyssey, Faust, Bib This is the groundbreaking book that officially introduced Jungian archetype theory into the realm of literary criticism. That should include the Golden Bough, Iliad, Odyssey, Faust, Bible, Greek tragedy and Greek comedy, some other readings in mythology, the more the merrier.2) Milton, Dante, Spencer, some novels, the more the merrier.3) Shakespeare. The word 'inductive' suggests some sort of scientific procedure. Frye is of course much more humble about it than Milton (but who isn't?), and, in addressing his miltonic-kantian task, offers this volume as a mere attempt to annotate T. Eliot's ideas (18) (which ideas I regard as thoroughly reactionary and dullard).

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It might take a while to get through and it might require you to convert a lot of Frye's work into shorter notes an Except for the comically inadequate introduction by Harold Bloom, this book is a window to a whole new way of seeing the literary universe.

It might take a while to get through and it might require you to convert a lot of Frye's work into shorter notes and diagrammatic notations, just to keep up with the density of the text, but at the end of it you will be exposed to an almost cosmic vision of Literature, comparable to that at the end of Paradiso.

The novel, a relatively recent form, a point Frye makes crystal clear in his later essay, "Specific Continuous Forms," presents a hero far removed from myth and romance.

For Frye, the hero of a novel is "superior neither to other men nor to his environment...[s/he's:] one of us" (low mimetic) or, in the ironic mode, "inferior in power or intelligence to ourselves, so that we have the sense of looking down on a scene of bondage, frustration, or absurdity" (34).

In scope and depth, it is an epic and no matter how cynically you approach it, Frye is going to awe you with sheer erudition and immaculate schematics.

For anyone with a Platonic bent, Frye's work has the potential to become an immediate Bible.I tend to agree with Frank Kermode’s critique of Frye’s literary grid: “[it is the:] breath of Hermione, the presence of Perdite, that are lost to view as you stand back; you sacrifice them to a system and a myth.”And yet, despite that bit of bitching, Frye’s book is one of those that peeps out now and then as I'm reading. Frye argues, for example, that there are five heroic modes: mythic, romantic, high mimetic, low mimetic, and irony; these five modes being applicable to either tragedy or comedy.In Frye's schematization, the hero's scope is fairly circumscribed, falling into one of the latter two modes: low mimetic fiction or ironic fiction.I…I vividly remember my reaction, when as an undergraduate, I read Northrop Frye’s Anatomy of Criticism as a required text in a course I was taking.I recall feeling engulfed as Frye trotted out one network of schematization after another: modes, symbols, myths, genres, accompanied by an endless march of terminology: high mimetic, low mimetic, phases, mythoi, alazons, sparagmos, anagogical, pharmakos, agon, eiron, etc., etc.It is worth the effort just for the sheer ambition of the work and for the bit of that ambition that will rub off on you, even if you reject everything else contained here.Only Joyce might be able to teach you about the scope of literature in a more inspiring fashion than this poet-critic.…I vividly remember my reaction, when as an undergraduate, I read Northrop Frye’s Anatomy of Criticism as a required text in a course I was taking.Striking out at the conception of criticism as restricted to mere opinion or ritual gesture, Northrop Frye wrote this magisterial work proceeding on the assumption that criticism is a structure of thought and knowledge in its own right.Employing examples of world literature from ancient times to the present, he provides a conceptual framework for the examination of litera Striking out at the conception of criticism as restricted to mere opinion or ritual gesture, Northrop Frye wrote this magisterial work proceeding on the assumption that criticism is a structure of thought and knowledge in its own right.The book begins innocently enough; in his “Polemical Introduction,” Frye discusses the critic’s role and the current gaps in literary theory (which, of course, he intends to fill).With the first essay, though, however, Frye begins to launch his system.

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