The Person Not Live Without Essay

The Person Not Live Without Essay-71
The human experience of borders is a contradictory one. At the same time, throughout history, and especially in modern times, people have tried to transcend the borders established by their ancestors.Often, borders are portrayed as a relic of the past.

The human experience of borders is a contradictory one. At the same time, throughout history, and especially in modern times, people have tried to transcend the borders established by their ancestors.Often, borders are portrayed as a relic of the past.

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Some regard borders as an affront to the human condition; others are convinced that borders make up the very foundation of their security.

As the debate about Europe’s borders rages on, it is worth taking a step back and asking this question: Can humanity live without borders?

’, asked my older sister on a wet and cold November night back in 1956.

The Furedi family was on the move, anxious to escape the Stalinist regime in Hungary and cross the border to Austria.

My view is that contemporary societies, and especially their cultural and political elites, find it difficult to gain meaning from symbolic borders.

Academic literature and much social commentary now implicitly question the moral status and even the legitimacy of borders.Often influenced by postmodernist theories – particularly those of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze – these thinkers depict borders as indeterminate and artificial constructions.The so-called artificiality of the borders between East and West, between civilised and uncivilised, or between Europe and Asia, is held up as evidence of the broader meaningless of all physical borders.These boundaries – between the ‘self’ and ‘other’ – often influence people’s sense of ‘us’ and ‘them’.Today, as in the past, our attitudes towards physical and spatial borders are influenced by our attitudes towards symbolic borders.For example, through the medium of culture individuals internalise the line, the border, between the sacred and the profane, between good and evil, between adult and child.Although these distinctions can appear as arbitrary, they provide the cultural resources through which people understand their day-to-day lives.In 1909, the remarkable German sociologist Georg Simmel gave us an eloquent reminder of the human impulse to draw borders: ‘Only to humanity, in contrast to nature, has the right to connect and separate been granted, and in the distinctive manner that one of these activities is always the presupposition of the other.’ In his essay ‘Bridge and Door’, Simmel highlighted the surprisingly intimate relationship between separation and connection.He wrote that ‘we can only sense those things to be related which we have previously somehow isolated from one another; things must first be separated from one another in order to be together’.The tendency to view borders, and indeed any strongly drawn distinction, in a negative light is widespread in contemporary popular culture.Being ‘post-border’ or ‘beyond borders’ is now considered a positive value.

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